dulcolax alternativen actos plus metformin 15850 nexium mups ohne rezept lotensin 20 mg price alternative to topamax for seizures maxalt 10 preis torsemide usp 10 mg calcium carbonate 450 mg and vitamin d 200iu kamagra 100mg für frauen erythromycin bs 500 mg ventolin kaufen online 4 db kamagra gold 100mg cymbalta 90 mg vs 120 mg alternative trental zyban 150 mg 60 clomiphene citrate 50 mg x50 propecia rezeptfrei kaufen plavix 75 kaufen endep alternative plavix q10 evista 10 mg moduretic 100 mg depo provera preisvergleich cialis für frauen preis phexin 500 dosage generika keppra trental 400 preise seroquel generika was bewirkt cialis bei frauen inderal kaufen online ranitidine 50 mg drug study arimidex alternatives steroids brand cialis 20mg dulcolax alternativen unique hoodia preis baclofen tabletten ohne rezept alternative to allopurinol for gout ciprobay saft 5 preis pulmicort topinasal ohne rezept bactrim 500 mg side effects micardis generic alternative nizoral 50ml betapace alternatives saw palmetto 2015 caverta 100 usage actoplus met 15 850 metformin 500 mg preisvergleich phexin 750 mg during pregnancy zyban 150 mg 60 zetia 10 mg toprol xl 50mg diflucan ohne rezept bestellen alternative for suhagra uroxatral 10 mg serophene 50 mg clomiphene citrate tenormin 50 mg price aspirin kaufen schweiz levaquin 750 mg generic ampicillin 1000x stock zestril 20 seroquel alternatives for sleep baclofen 500 mg flagyl 1000 mg bid zenegra-md 100 mg nedir pletal 100 mg price generika dutasterid betnovate skin cream 20g maxalt lingua 10mg kaufen kamagra soft tabs kaufen zerit 20 mg diamox generika xeloda alternativen arimidex alternatives steroids kamagra 100mg für frauen alternative ortho tri cyclen lo efexor generika actos plus metformin 15850 naprosyn 1000 safran kaufen fertomid tablet 100mg tetracycline salbe kaufen natural alternative to meclizine side effects of voveran sr 100 acivir 200 dt dosage dramamine 50 mg dosis zyrtec 100 tablets dulcolax dragees alternative retin a micro $50 off serevent diskus 50 mcg price aspirin effect generika casodex 50 mg preis natural alternatives to remeron Blog – Collins Group Because Your Mission Matters 2016-08-30T17:57:27Z http://collinsgroup.com/feed/atom/ WordPress http://collinsgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/cg-cc-logo_square-150x150.jpg Kate Banta-Green <![CDATA[The Big Three: How to Engage Your Donors with Social Media]]> http://collinsgroup.com/?p=3194 2016-08-29T16:30:09Z 2016-08-29T16:28:41Z This post is part of our 2016 blog series, The Changing Faces of Philanthropy in the Northwest. All year long we’ll be exploring how the profound changes and contrasts in our […]

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PrintThis post is part of our 2016 blog series, The Changing Faces of Philanthropy in the Northwest. All year long we’ll be exploring how the profound changes and contrasts in our demographics, economy, and beliefs are impacting philanthropy in our region. Join the conversation!

Based in the Pacific Northwest, one of the tech capitals of the world, one would expect local nonprofits to know automatically how to use technology—specifically social media—to the best of its ability. But “best use” is not always intuitive. As fundraisers, our job is to connect with people who are passionate about the change we are making in the world and ask them to engage in our work, financially or otherwise. Since social media was created to connect people, it’s a great platform to tell your story and show your knowledge. But how can it help nonprofits engage donors?

There are three big questions I hear repeatedly from local nonprofit clients and peers around this question. Here are the answers.

Q: Where should my nonprofit post content?
A: Probably on Facebook, but it doesn’t hurt to ask!

Despite highly publicized differences between how generations use social media, Facebook remains by far the dominant platform of the day; at least 59% of the 68-and-over generation, 71% of Boomers, 77% of GenX-ers, and 90% of Millennials in this country are on Facebook.* Indeed, an overwhelming 95.8% of social media marketers worldwide name Facebook the most effective marketing tool with the highest return on investment in a March 2016 survey. And specific to the Pacific Northwest, according to a 2015 report, 80% of the public are using social media, with the most frequently used platform among this group being Facebook (90%).

If your development shop is like most, you have limited resources and staffing to expend upon social media engagement. And it is far better to post strong content on one channel then to be spread thinly across multiple ones. If you have to choose one platform, choose Facebook. (But there is a catch to this one-channel approach: the new Facebook algorithm is emphasizing videos, so you probably need to be active on YouTube as well!)

Of course, these numbers are for the general population—to really know where your donors are online, ask them! Survey your donors to find out what platforms they use, if they are connected to your organization online, and what type of information they want to receive from you via social media. A survey is a great way to kick-start online engagement, and the information will help you focus your social media efforts.

Q: What should my nonprofit post?
A: Mostly “gifts,” sprinkled with a few calls to action!

There is so much information and noise online that it’s imperative you post only relevant, meaningful information. Think of social media as a place where you can:

  • Show your expertise
  • Share your impact stories
  • Activate your network

Personally, I love International Justice Mission’s 80/20 rule: 80% of social media content must be “gifts” to its followers (i.e., information and expertise that its audience would find interesting and useful), and only 20 percent can be calls to action (requests for donations or other kinds of support). Before you post, ask yourself, “Is this is content a gift to our followers?” or, “Are we asking them to do something important?” If not, change the content.

Q: How do we know if it’s working?
A: Measure engagement—not dollars raised!

Remember that social media is designed to connect people, not to raise money. Unless you launch a specific, online-only campaign (think Ice Bucket Challenge), you are not going to be able to measure how much of your fundraising is a direct result of social media. Instead, measure non-financial goals in terms of engagement. Is your social media content driving people to your website? If so, which posts lead them there? What kinds of content are people liking or retweeting? Can you improve these numbers? Do you know everyone who has liked or shared your posts? Do you have a plan for how to bring them in closer?

Get with the program!

As Aggie Sweeney pointed out in her analysis of recent giving trends data, social media is making a significant impact on philanthropy. Online giving increased 9.2% in 2015, and the upward trend shows no sign of slowing. In order to stay relevant, give your donors what they want to hear, see, and feel in online places where they already gather.

 

*Source: 2016 Advancement Northwest Forum on Strategic Fundraising; Session Eight, Lessons from an Award-Winning Campaign

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Dan Pronovost http://collinsgroup.com <![CDATA[What’s in a Name? Three Things Arts & Culture Nonprofits Should Know About Naming Rights]]> http://collinsgroup.com/?p=3183 2016-08-09T18:31:47Z 2016-08-09T15:52:34Z The desire many donors have for their generosity to be remembered in some tangible way has been a part of philanthropy for a long time. In fact, the first evidence […]

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Naming-Rights-ArtsCultureOrganizations200pxsThe desire many donors have for their generosity to be remembered in some tangible way has been a part of philanthropy for a long time. In fact, the first evidence we have of physical donor recognition goes back some 5,000 years; anthropologists believe that the benefactor of an ancient Sumerian temple is represented on—wait for it—a plaque on the temple wall.*

Naming opportunities are a time-honored way for organizations to leverage significant gifts during capital campaigns. And historically, those rights have been granted in perpetuity. But complications have begun to arise, now that these one-time gifts’ legacies are outlasting the useful lives of the buildings themselves. In other words, when it’s time to renovate or replace an aging facility, organizations find themselves having to fund a campaign without being able to offer donors that time-tested plaque on the wall.

Perhaps the most publicized example of this quandary happened around Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center in New York City. If you’ll recall, Avery Fisher donated $10 million in 1973 for the building and was granted naming rights in perpetuity. His family “threatened legal action if the concert hall was rebuilt or renovated under a new name.” Twelve years and many mediated discussions later, the Fisher family finally allowed Lincoln Center to rename the space, but the price was hefty: $15 million, prominent recognition of Mr. Fisher in the new lobby, and a family member seat on the Lincoln Center Hall of Fame’s advisory board, among other inducements. To prevent more situations like this, nonprofits—especially in the arts and culture space where venues are king—are changing the way they offer and execute naming rights for their theaters, performing arts centers, museums, stages, concert halls, and more.

Three Things Arts and Culture Nonprofits Should Know About Naming Rights

  1. Be transparent. Above all, create transparent pledge forms and gift agreements that clearly delineate gift parameters, duration, and procedures for resolving differences. Depending on the size of your organization, consider forming a Gift Stewardship Committee within your Board of Directors to vet extraordinary circumstances (e.g., what if the donor’s name becomes “tainted” by a public scandal?).
  2. Intent is key. The Avery Fisher case was settled because, when the family dug deep into the intent of that original $10 million gift, they realized that what Avery Fisher truly wanted was not his name on a wall for all time, but to create and preserve a venue for future generations that showcased the classical music that he loved. In this case, a written statement of his intent could have saved everyone 12 years of headache.
  3. Be creative. There are many other ways to incorporate naming rights besides the “forever plaque!” A substantial gift could create an endowed fund that covers 100% of the ongoing maintenance and renovation needs of the space. Naming can be time-limited, and the original donor can be given “first dibs” on renewing. You can establish a named fund for all kinds of things: commission new works, a lecture series, scholarships, touring subsidies. Find out what your donors’ interests are and align your naming opportunities with those interests.

As with any significant gift, naming rights require diligent communication between your development officers, Board of Directors, and donors. The more open, detailed, and honest these discussions are, the more likely your naming opportunities will benefit all parties for many years to come.

Want More?

For more on this topic, watch our recent webinar, Your Name Here: The Complex Practice of “Naming” within the Arts and Culture Sector, featuring Aggie Sweeney, President & CEO of Collins Group, and Directors of Development at Seattle Opera and Ravinia Festival.

Sources and Further Reading

*Private Motive and Perpetual Conditions in Charitable Naming Gifts: When Good Names Go BadJohn K. Eason (2005)

Avery Fisher Hall Forever, Heirs SayRobin Pogrebin at The New York Times (2002)

Lincoln Center to Rename Avery Fisher HallRobin Pogrebin at The New York Times (2014)

 

 

 

 

 

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Norea Hoeft <![CDATA[Aggie Sweeney Elected Chair of Giving USA Foundation]]> http://collinsgroup.com/?p=3172 2016-07-13T17:58:43Z 2016-07-11T21:45:37Z   On Thursday, July 7, Aggie Sweeney, CFRE, was elected Chair of Giving USA Foundation during its annual meeting in Napa Valley. She takes the helm after serving on the […]

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View More: http://ciccarelliphotography.pass.us/collinsgroup

          Aggie Sweeney

On Thursday, July 7, Aggie Sweeney, CFRE, was elected Chair of Giving USA Foundation during its annual meeting in Napa Valley. She takes the helm after serving on the Foundation board for the past six years.

Best known for its seminal publication, Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy, the Foundation’s mission is to advance “the research, education and public understanding of philanthropy.” Aggie has been instrumental in helping to disseminate, interpret, and help nonprofits leverage the information and data about trends in charitable giving for which Giving USA is so well known and regarded.

Aggie is recognized as one of the top fundraisers in the country; her expertise as a change agent for organizations regardless of size and sector has earned her a reputation as an insightful listener and strategist. She has served as a trusted advisor and fundraising consultant to over 100 diverse nonprofit organizations and for over 35 multiyear campaigns. Many of the campaigns for which she provided principal counsel have been record-breaking, both for the organization and the specific sector the organization serves. With over 30 years of experience in the nonprofit sector, she is passionate about guiding organizations to use philanthropy to power growth.

Aggie is the current President & CEO of Collins Group, a division of Campbell & Company, a national consulting firm that collaborates and innovates with people who change lives through philanthropic vision and action. Aggie joined the firm in 1999, and her expert leadership has enhanced its position as the Northwest’s fundraising consulting firm of choice.

“This is an important role in our field and high praise for Aggie’s leadership in our sector,” says Peter Fissinger, President & CEO of Campbell & Company, who also serves as Treasurer on the Giving Institute’s Board of Directors. “In particular, by being asked to serve in this role, Aggie is recognized for her experience, intelligence, diplomacy, and reliability as a volunteer leader in the Foundation.”

Please join us in congratulating Aggie!

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Jen Lee <![CDATA[Crowdsourced Fundraising Goes Local]]> http://collinsgroup.com/?p=3126 2016-07-07T19:43:11Z 2016-07-07T19:40:47Z This post is part of our 2016 blog series, The Changing Faces of Philanthropy in the Northwest. All year long we’ll be exploring how the profound changes and contrasts in our […]

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crowdfundingThis post is part of our 2016 blog series, The Changing Faces of Philanthropy in the Northwest. All year long we’ll be exploring how the profound changes and contrasts in our demographics, economy, and beliefs are impacting philanthropy in our region. Join the conversation!

Until recently, I was not a fan of crowdsourced fundraising. Just the words “crowdsourced” and “crowdfunding” conjured up a mental image of the mindless masses, which is so contrary to what we fundraising professionals preach as ultimate truth: relationship-based fundraising. People won’t give unless they have a relationship with the organization and its people, and unless they are connected to the mission. How can they make that connection in a crowd of people patched together from all over the Internet?

What I didn’t take into account is that, in the age of social media, people relate to each other, often and effectively, online. Social media is being used more and more to organize and mobilize local movements, and the Northwest—a global hub for technology and innovation (see our recent blog post about tech millennials)—is no exception. Two recent successes of clients right here in the Puget Sound region—Intiman Theatre and Friends of 88.5 FM—helped me think differently about crowdsourced fundraising. Done correctly, it is a natural extension of tried and true best fundraising practices.

Compelling, Urgent, and Audacious

You’ll see from the snapshots below that, while the campaigns for Intiman and 88.5 are different on the surface, they have a few key things in common: a very compelling case (the projects they wanted to fund were of paramount importance to their audience), urgency (they both had hard and fast deadlines), and an audacious goal ($75K in 16 days and $7M in 6 months, respectively). I know, I know! We always say “set a realistic goal,” but having a compelling case—backed up by an excellent strategy, plan, and resources—can compensate for a goal that might seem unfeasible at first. And let me underscore the fact that each organization was willing to invest the time, money, and energy to ensure success.

INTIMAN THEATRE’S “SHOW THE LOVE” CAMPAIGN

Concept

Enlist team leaders to reach out to their networks; support team leaders with materials (video links, communications language, benefits, etc.) to make the case for and encourage giving

Goal

$75,000 in 16 days

Case

Support Intiman’s 2016 season, highlighting and celebrating the work of black, female playwrights; and Intiman’s vision of promoting and achieving racial and gender equity through theatre

Results

  • $82,963 raised, plus a match of $50,000 from a current donor
  • Total Number of Donors: 641
  • Percentage of New Donors: 69%

Highlights

  • Fundraising medium allowed Intiman to showcase its strengths as a theatre and arts organization
  • Invested in an innovative campaign website
  • Created a giving platform for all, regardless of capacity, level of engagement, and location
  • Gained new donors and created a tight Intiman community by implementing stewardship strategy

FRIENDS OF 88.5 FM’s GIVEBIG 2016 CAMPAIGN

Overall Goal

$7 million in six months

Case

Support Friends of 88.5 FM to purchase KPLU and “save” current programming, by making a gift before June 30, 2016

Results

Set a GiveBIG record by raising $1,456,076!

Total Number of Donors: 7,609

Highlights

  • Through GiveBIG alone, Friends of 88.5 FM raised more than 20% of its overall goal
  • The GiveBIG effort was a mini-campaign within a campaign, which heightened the larger campaign’s momentum (read more about the SAVE KPLU campaign, which surpassed its goal in just 4.5 months!)
  • Excitement from the record-breaking results created a sense of community ownership

In planning a crowdfunding campaign, be sure to have a strategy to leverage current donors’ resources and relationships, and a plan to capture new donors and keep them captivated.

Still not sure if crowdsource funding is right for your nonprofit? Take this quiz by Consultant Kate Banta-Green.

Join the conversation

Have a comment on this post or an idea for this blog series? We’d love to hear your thoughts. Leave a suggestion in the comments below, or contact us at info@collinsgroup.com.

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Norea Hoeft <![CDATA[James Plourde Promoted to Vice President]]> http://collinsgroup.com/?p=3142 2016-06-07T21:25:22Z 2016-06-07T21:22:26Z Since joining Collins Group five years ago, James Plourde has been instrumental in expanding the impact of several organizations, most notably in the fields of education, healthcare, arts and culture, and […]

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View More: http://ciccarelliphotography.pass.us/collinsgroupSince joining Collins Group five years ago, James Plourde has been instrumental in expanding the impact of several organizations, most notably in the fields of education, healthcare, arts and culture, and faith-based nonprofits. A long-time Tacoma resident, James continues to position Collins Group as the firm of choice in the South Sound region and is a member of the of AFP-South Sound Board of Directors. He has served as lead counsel for phenomenally successful campaigns for Friends of 88.5/KPLU, MultiCare, Catholic Community Services, and Bishop Blanchet High School (currently underway). And his contribution as a thought leader in our sector is substantial, insightful, and often a breath of fresh air. But what we love most about James is that he is a true “people person” – his clients (and colleagues!) feel cared for, listened to, and valued. Please join us in congratulating James for this much deserved step forward in his career!

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James Plourde <![CDATA[KPLU Makes Public Media History]]> http://collinsgroup.com/?p=3134 2016-06-02T17:54:44Z 2016-06-01T19:07:57Z When the folks at KPLU called and asked if our firm would help them raise $7 million in six months to save the station from being sold, my first question […]

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KPLU campaign logoWhen the folks at KPLU called and asked if our firm would help them raise $7 million in six months to save the station from being sold, my first question was: “Do you have a refund system in place?”

In hindsight, not the most encouraging response, given that they exceeded their goal in all of 4.5 months. To the best of anyone’s recollection, this was a history making event: no public media outlet has raised that much money in that short of time.

For those outside the Pacific Northwest, KPLU is one of two powerhouse public radio stations serving the region. Owned by and partially located on the campus of Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington, it was in the process of being sold to the other powerhouse public radio station in the area, KUOW (owned by the University of Washington) for $7 million in cash and $1 million in underwriting support.

Loyal listeners balked at this plan and formed a separate 501c(3) organization, Friends of 88.5 FM. They set their sights on raising the $7 million on their own to purchase the station from the university and make the station a community licensee, and the SAVE KPLU campaign was (quickly!) born.

There was no time for the kinds of things you would normally do when you launch a campaign: no lead gift phase, no steering committee (though we tried to form one), no landing that big major gift before appealing to the public.

And no time to accept pledges! Every dollar of the $7 million had to be in the bank by June 30.

Instead, it was everything at once—public phase, major gift phase, corporation and foundation phase—you name it, we were in it. They did it in record fashion—surpassing the goal a full month and four days before the deadline.

Some lessons learned:

  • Urgency works. Successful campaigns have a mix of great volunteers, a compelling case, a pool of donors, and a sense of urgency. The last point can be the most difficult to demonstrate. For KPLU, the urgency was easy to understand: simply do or die.
  • Community works. The don’t call it PUBLIC media for nothing. The largest gift in this campaign was $250,000. A few came in at the $100,000 level, but most of the 24,000-plus contributions were relatively modest. If not for the sheer volume of gifts, Friends of 88.5 would never have reached the $7 million goal.
  • Challenges work. Challenges and public radio are like peas and carrots, to paraphrase Forest Gump. KPLU used them to full advantage, amassing a series of $500,000 challenges to pogo-stick their way to their final goal.
  • Crowdfunding works. GiveBIG, Washington’s annual giving day sponsored by Seattle Foundation, is what tipped the scales in this campaign. They will have to rename it “Give Gi-normous” in 2017, given that KPLU smashed all previous records by raising close to $1.5 million on this single day.
  • A simple but dogged plan works. The KPLU campaign overcame one obstacle after another. We stuck to a simple plan of using staff time to approach the top prospects, and keep contacting them until we got an answer. Most of the lead gifts were put into the challenge pool, which were then presented to the public, who gobbled them up like popcorn.

The coming months will be spent negotiating the sale agreement with PLU, seeking approval from the FCC, and forming a transition plan. From a development perspective, though, this is one for the record books, and something that other public media would do well to study for relevant takeaways.

 

 

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Tricia Brooks <![CDATA[Engaging the Elusive Tech Millennial Donor]]> http://collinsgroup.com/?p=3118 2016-05-16T19:06:38Z 2016-05-16T19:04:58Z This post is part of our 2016 blog series, The Changing Faces of Philanthropy in the Northwest. All year long we’ll be exploring how the profound changes and contrasts in our […]

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People looking at phones-smallThis post is part of our 2016 blog series, The Changing Faces of Philanthropy in the Northwest. All year long we’ll be exploring how the profound changes and contrasts in our demographics, economy, and beliefs are impacting philanthropy in our region. Join the conversation!

Young tech talent is flocking to the Northwest from around the country and world. As Associate Consultant Anna Goren discussed in last month’s post about the fate of local faith-based nonprofits, thanks to the tech boom, our region is “now home to one of the highest concentrations of wealthy millennials in the nation, who are poised to have the largest buying power of any generation in the U.S. by 2017” (Millenial Impact Report). Seattle is now tied for having the fourth highest percentage of “superrich millennials” in the country (Seattle Times). In Portland, tech talent growth is outpacing Silicon Valley (Portland Business Journal).

With all that wealth, tech millennials have the potential to make a significant impact on our community, and the fundraising sector is all abuzz with talk of engagement strategies for this seemingly “elusive” population. As a millennial with many tech millennial friends, I can tell you that they are educated, savvy, smart, and community-minded. All you need is a common sense approach.

6 Ways to Engage Tech Millennials

  1. Take them seriously, as you would any potential significant donor. Assume they are knowledgeable and aware of issues facing the community.
  2. Hire millennials. One of the best ways to engage a particular group is to have a member of the group on staff who will bring first-hand knowledge of and insight into the population you’re targeting.
  3. Emphasize impact. Anna also said this last month but it bears repeating: According to the Millenial Impact Report, “78 percent of millennials were very likely or somewhat likely to stop donating if they didn’t know how the donation was making an impact.” I’d wager the percentage is even higher for tech millennials, who tend to be “investor donors.”
  4. Let them lead. Millennials are often overlooked for board positions since young people are presumed to have limited experience and connections. On the contrary, millennials—especially ones who work in tech and who live and breathe social media—are probably better connected than the rest of us!
  5. Develop an outreach strategy to attract them, including volunteer opportunities and targeted events. Newcomers are thirsty for opportunities to meet people, and tech millennials crave something more intellectually stimulating than the local club. Great example: “OMSI After Dark” (think science fair meets beer garden).
  6. Tap into their intellectual curiosity. Tech people are not just smart; they get truly excited about innovation and creativity. Think of ways to capture the attention of this group and scratch their intellectual itch. Ask your executive director to provide insight on a recent event in the news, or consider hosting a forum with leading experts on a particular mission-related topic.

Tech millennials should be an integral part of fueling your donor pipeline. Make your organization accessible to them, and it will pay off!

Join the conversation

Have a comment on this post or an idea for this blog series? We’d love to hear your thoughts. Leave a suggestion in the comments below, or contact us at info@collinsgroup.com.

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Norea Hoeft <![CDATA[Collins Group Hiring Senior and Associate Consultants]]> http://collinsgroup.com/?p=3110 2016-04-18T23:23:28Z 2016-04-18T23:23:28Z Job Openings We are currently hiring for the following positions: Senior Consultant Associate Consultant Please read the complete position descriptions for information on how to apply.  

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Job Openings

We are currently hiring for the following positions:

Senior Consultant
Associate Consultant

Please read the complete position descriptions for information on how to apply.

 

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Norea Hoeft <![CDATA[Collins’ partner YMCA of Snohomish County receives Eagle Award for Excellence in Fundraising]]> http://collinsgroup.com/?p=3102 2016-04-11T13:10:00Z 2016-04-04T17:26:38Z April 6, 2016 Tomorrow evening, April 7, 2016, staff at YMCA of Snohomish County, Washington, will be honored at the Eagle Award Banquet at the NAYDO (North American YMCA Development […]

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April 6, 2016

Tomorrow evening, April 7, 2016, staff at YMCA of Snohomish County, Washington, will be honored at the Eagle Award Banquet at the NAYDO (North American YMCA Development Organization) Conference in Detroit. The award recognizes “associations who are integrating philanthropy into all aspects of YMCA work in North America.” Having partnered with the Y for the past five years, we at Collins are delighted (and not the least bit surprised) to see them receiving this distinction.

“This recognition is reflective of every aspect of our work at the Y and we want to recognize and congratulate each member of our team!” said Scott Washburn, President and CEO, when sharing the news with staff and supporters.

Beyond just acknowledging the actual dollars raised, award nominees were also evaluated in multiple categories recognized in the fundraising industry as crucial to successful development, including leadership involvement in fundraising, relationship building across the organization, board engagement with development, effective communications, and more.

“This is a team award and is representative of the importance of our significant Social Responsibility work,” said Scott Sadler, Senior Vice President and Chief Development Officer.

Collins’ partnership with YMCA of Snohomish County goes back to 2011, when we conducted a campaign planning study. Since then, 95% of the funds needs for the new Stanwood-Camano YMCA have been raised and the new facility will open early this fall. The new Everett YMCA secured its site last year and is preparing for groundbreaking in 2018.

“This award is awesome,” says Collins President & CEO, Aggie Sweeney, who serves as lead counsel to the Y. “The Y is really expanding its services and strengthening partnerships with the community. They have secured some of the largest gifts we have seen for any human services campaign this decade, and they are also reaching new goals with their annual campaign.”

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Anna Goren <![CDATA[Are faith-based nonprofits doomed in the Northwest?]]> http://collinsgroup.com/?p=3098 2016-03-30T19:05:42Z 2016-03-29T22:15:23Z This post is part of our 2016 blog series, The Changing Faces of Philanthropy in the Northwest. All year long we’ll be exploring how the profound changes and contrasts in […]

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R.I.PThis post is part of our 2016 blog series, The Changing Faces of Philanthropy in the Northwest. All year long we’ll be exploring how the profound changes and contrasts in our demographics, economy, and beliefs are impacting philanthropy in our region. Join the conversation!


 

Shortly before World War I, a Methodist leader reportedly commented that the “air of the Northwest [is] too rare for prayer.”

Roughly a century later, the Pacific Northwest is still known for its unique brand of polite secularism. Research supports that ours is the most “unchurched” region in the United States, with 63 percent of individuals choosing not to participate in church, synagogue, mosque, or temple, according to Dr. Patricia Killen.

Thanks to our booming tech industry, the Northwest is also now home to one of the highest concentrations of wealthy millennials in the nation, who are poised to have the largest buying power of any generation in the U.S. by 2017. And millennials promise to take this secular trend to new heights. Now the fastest growing demographic in the country, millennials are twice as likely to be religiously unaffiliated as their parents and three times as likely as their grandparents, according to the Millennial Impact Report.

So, are religiously affiliated nonprofits doomed in the Northwest?

Hardly. While these numbers tell us that attendance at Sunday mass may be dwindling away, it’s hard to imagine the Northwest without many of its leading universities, hospitals, and human services organizations. Washington state’s largest local provider of assistance to poor and vulnerable people is Catholic Community Services of Western Washington. Seattle’s oldest refugee resettlement organization, in operation for 124 years, is Jewish Family Service. One of the largest charities in the country, Worldvision International, is an Evangelical Christian organization headquartered in Federal Way. The list goes on.

Creating a more broadly appealing case for faith-based nonprofits

Historically, faith-based organizations have seized natural opportunities to rally an already-assembled community around values-based causes. However, people often (and usually erroneously) perceive that faith-based orgs restrict their services to their own faith communities, and so secular donors may be less inclined to give.

There are a few things your faith-based nonprofit can do to better communicate your role in a secular society under the growing influence of millennial donors—without compromising your beliefs and values:

  1. Highlight issue expertise. While donors who are part of the religious community already have many opportunities to connect with faith-based organizations, secular donors sometimes have fewer natural entry points. If your organization has developed expertise over time in a certain issue, population, or program that is relevant to the public, make it known! Share your knowledge in networks that focus on these issues, positioning yourselves as community institutions and thought leaders.
  2. Highlight secular partnerships. Because of their longevity and permanence, faith-based organizations often provide government services through contracts and are well connected to other organizations. When you draw attention to these partnerships, you demonstrate your organization’s role as a key player in the wider nonprofit landscape and improve visibility in broader circles.
  3. Take the ‘humanist’ angle. A case built around religious motivations for giving can mobilize some while alienating others. Instead, focus on humanist language from your faith tradition, which will resonate with your religious base and help rally the wider community. For example, Seattle University, rated one of the top five colleges in Washington state, is a Jesuit institution with a diverse, multi-faith student body. It’s mission statement draws from Jesuit teachings, but articulates a much wider vision:
    Seattle University is dedicated to educating the whole person, to professional formation, and to empowering leaders for a just and humane world.
  4. Emphasize impacts. The best ways to inspire donor confidence are communicating consistently and documenting measured impact. According to the Millenial Impact Report, 85 percent of millennials are motivated to give by a compelling mission or cause that speaks to them personally, not because of a workplace, religious, or celebrity endorsement. They are also more demanding as donors: 78 percent were very likely or somewhat likely to stop donating if they didn’t know how the donation was making an impact.
  5. Control perceptions. It’s easier to believe that “Jewish Family Service” is restricted to people of Jewish faith than to assume “Worldvision” only helps Christians. If changing your name is out of the question, clarify loudly and often that you serve the larger community. Highlight donor and impact stories that show the breadth of your impact, and publicize statements like this website FAQ from Catholic Community Services:
    Catholic Community Services and Catholic Housing Services help all people regardless of their religious affiliation. We don’t ask about people’s beliefs, we ask how we can help.

Faith-based nonprofits are an integral piece of the social safety net and civic fabric of our community. Millennials are rapidly becoming the high-capacity philanthropists of tomorrow. With a little bit of shared understanding, these two groups can have a long and bright future together.

Join the conversation

Have an idea for this blog series? We’d love to hear your thoughts. Leave a suggestion in the comments below, or contact us at info@collinsgroup.com.

 

 

 

 

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